Artist Copyright Statement: With 4 Easy Examples You Can Use

Are you an artist looking to protect your creative work? If so, a basic understanding of copyright law is something you should know about so that you can protect yourself legally against intellectual property thieves.

Copyright law provides artists with some legal protection for original works of authorship, including artistic creations.

As artists, it’s important to be careful with how you use and share your work to ensure that you retain your rights as the creator.

With the unprecedented growth in AI art ‘borrowing’ our art online to produce derivatives of our art in a mash-up, it is even more important to know where we stand.

A way to protect your work is by creating an artist copyright statement. This statement outlines the rights you retain as the creator and informs others of the legal implications of using your work without permission.

By including a copyright statement, you can ensure that your creative work is protected and that others are aware of the legal consequences of infringing on your rights.

In this post, I will explore with you the importance of artist copyright statements and provide examples of how to create one for your own work.

While realistically, it will not stop or prevent the most determined of thieves, it will remind everyone who owns the image.

Creating an Artist Copyright Statement

As a creative artist, it is essential to protect your original works from illegal use and distribution. A way to do this is by producing an artist copyright statement. In this section, we will discuss what should be included in an artist copyright statement, how to write one, where to display it, and what to do if your art is sold or rented out.

What Should Be Included in an Artist Copyright Statement?

Your artist copyright statement should include the following information:

  • The copyright symbol or the word “copyright”
  • Your name as the copyright owner or author of the work
  • The year the content was published, which can be different from the year of creation
  • A statement of the rights you’re reserving over the materials
  • A statement that the works cannot be modified without your permission
When writing your artist copyright statement, make sure to use clear and concise language. Be careful not to use copyrighted materials in your statement. You can use a table or bullet points to make your statement more organized and easier to read.

How to Write an Artist Copyright Statement

When writing your artist copyright statement, make sure to use clear and concise language. Be careful not to use copyrighted materials in your statement.

You can use a table or bullet points to make your statement more organized and easier to read.

If you need a free copyright notice template, here are four examples of an artist copyright statement that you can copy and paste for free:

Artist Copyright Statement Copy and Paste Example 1:

“Copyright © [Year of Creation] by [Artist’s Name]. All rights reserved.

No part of this artwork may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the artist.”

Artist Copyright Statement Copy and Paste Example 2:

“© [Year of Creation] [Artist’s Name]. This artwork is protected under international copyright laws and agreements.

No part of this artwork may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the artist.”

Artist Copyright Statement Copy and Paste Example 3:

“All artwork and images on this site are the exclusive property of [Artist’s Name] and are protected under the United States and International Copyright laws.

The images may not be reproduced, copied, transmitted, or manipulated without the written permission of [Artist’s Name]. All rights reserved.”

Artist Copyright Statement Copy and Paste Example 4:

“© [Year of Creation] [Artist’s Name]. The copyright of this artwork remains with the artist. The artwork may not be reproduced or redistributed, either in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the artist.”

Remember to replace the placeholders [Year of Creation] and [Artist’s Name] with the relevant information.

Where to Display an Artist Copyright Statement?

Your artist copyright statement should be displayed prominently next to where your art is visible on your sites, social media accounts, or other platforms where your art is displayed or sold.

You should also include it in your email signature or on business cards if they contain a thumbnail of your artworks.

What if Your Art is Sold or Rented Out?

If your art is sold or rented out, you must include a clause in any contract that you use that states that the buyer or renter don’t own and don’t have the rights to distribute or reproduce the work without your permission.

You need to also make sure you register your copyright with the appropriate state and federal authorities to protect your works from illegal use.

USA: You can easily register your copyright at the US Copyright Office – Copyright.gov.

Canada: You can register your copyright here.

UK/AUS: You do not need to register your copyright. You automatically become the copyright holder when you create a work. For artists outside the USA I would suggest using a technique I was told years ago when we used snail mail.

Make a copy or print a photo of your work and mail it back to yourself. Do not open it. The postage stamp is a legal timestamp, and the contents sealed inside are proof that you own it.

Australia: You can still formally register a copyright here.

Creating an artist copyright statement is a key step in protecting your original works from illegal use and distribution. By including the necessary information and displaying it prominently, you can ensure that your rights as an artist are respected.

Understanding Artist Copyright Statement

What is Copyright?

In most Western countries, copyright is an old legal doctrine and concept that gives the creator of original works (such as a painting, photograph, or sculpture) exclusive rights to that work.

These include the right to reproduce the work, make derivative works of the artworks (such as adaptations or translations – but some derivatives are covered by Fair Use), distribute their own copies of the work, and display publicly or perform the work without the copywrite owner’s written permission.

What is a Copyright Notice?

A copyright notice is a statement that identifies the owner of the copyright and the year of first publication. 

It usually includes:

  • the copyright symbol (©)
  • the name of the copyright owner
  • and the year of first publication. For example, © 2023 John Smith.

Why is a Copyright Notice Important for Artists?

A copyright notice is quite important for artists because it informs or tells others that the work is protected by copyright and that someone owns the copyright. It can also help deter copyright infringement and makes it easier for you to enforce your rights if someone does infringe on your copyright.

What is Intellectual Property?

Intellectual property refers to any original creations of the mind. It includes creations such as inventions, literary and artistic works, music, symbols, names, and images used in commerce. Intellectual property is protected by law and includes copyright, trademark, and patent protection.

What is Protected Under Copyright?

Copyright protects original works of authorship that are fixed in a tangible medium of expression.

This includes literary works (such as books and poems), musical works (such as songs and compositions), dramatic works (such as plays and screenplays), and visual works (such as paintings, photographs, and sculptures).

Using an Artist Copyright Statement

As an artist, it is vital to protect your artwork and creative works. One way to do this is by using an artist copyright statement. This statement is a legal document that claims ownership of your original content and sets out the terms and conditions for the use of your work by others.

In this section, we will discuss the acceptable and unacceptable uses of copyrighted material, the consequences of copyright infringement, and more.

What are the Acceptable Uses of Copyrighted Material?

If you own the copyright to a piece of artwork or creative work, you have the exclusive right to reproduce, distribute, and display it publicly. However, you can grant permission for others to use your work in certain ways.

For example, you may allow others to view, download, or print pages containing your artwork for personal purposes. You may also grant a license to use your work for commercial or non-commercial purposes.

What are the Unacceptable Uses of Copyrighted Material?

It is crucial to be careful when using copyrighted material that belongs to someone else. You cannot republish, sell, rent, or sub-license material that you do not own.

You cannot redistribute material without permission or exploit it for personal gain. Additionally, you cannot edit or otherwise modify someone else’s work without their consent.

What are the Consequences of Copyright Infringement?

Consequences vary for copyright infringement. Let’s say you infringe on someone else’s copyright; you may face legal action, including monetary damages and injunctions.

You might also be compelled to pay legal costs and damages to the copyright owner. In some cases, copyright infringement can even damage the reputation of the artist or creative work.

To avoid the risk of any copyright infringement, it is important to understand the basics of the laws and regulations surrounding copyright and other intellectual property rights. You should also consider registering your copyright with the Copyright Office and seeking legal advice if necessary.

Using an artist’s copyright statement is a necessary step to protect your artwork and creative works. By setting out the terms and conditions for the use of your work, you can ensure that others respect your intellectual property rights and avoid legal issues.

One Comment

  1. Wow thank you for these examples. I found other articles hard to follow but your examples helped me a lot. I am not a native English speaker.

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