52 Healing Broken Drawing Ideas to Mend a Heart

Ever felt that heavy ache in your chest, the kind that seems to spread through your whole body during times of heartbreak and sadness?

You’re not alone, we’ve all been through it.

Turning that pain into art can be a powerful way to get through tough times. As artists, we can use our skills to turn drawings into a form of therapy.

Now let’s turn our heartaches into nice drawing reminders that prove we can get through this.

Simple Drawing Ideas To Start With

Before we go into the broken drawing ideas I have put together for you, let’s have a look at 8 simple ones that will get us started.

Drawing a Heartbreak

Start by drawing simple straight lines and slowly change them so they look like a heart that’s been broken.

It’s a pretty easy thing to draw, you just have to try a few times with your pencil.

drawing a heartbreak in pencil

Crushed Heart

Draw a heart being crushed to show how a heart feels when it’s hurt. This drawing can get a bit detailed and shows how deep the hurt can be.

crushed heart drawing

Puzzle Heart

Sketch a heart made of puzzle pieces, and leave some out, to show a heart that’s trying to heal itself. You can make it look cooler by drawing different designs inside each puzzle piece.

puzzle heart drawing

Real Heart with a Twist

Try drawing an actual heart, but add stuff like thorns, tear drops, or broken bits to show feelings of being let down or sad. It’s a strong way to show those tough feelings.

Real Heart with a Twist

Broken Heart in Colors

Draw a broken heart using lots of colors, with each color standing for a step in getting over the hurt. It’s a good way to let out feelings and have fun with colors.

broken Heart in Colors

Songs and Heartbreak

Mix your favorite sad songs with your drawing. Make a picture of a heart-shaped balloon that’s floating away, carrying music notes from those songs. It’s a way to show you are letting go.

Songs and Heartbreak

Nature and Hearts

Picture your heart as something from nature, like a leaf or a snowflake, pretty but easy to break. Fill in the broken heart with nature patterns to show both beauty and sadness together.

Nature and Hearts

Mirror of Feelings

Imagine your heartbreak as a broken mirror, with each piece showing a different part of what you’re feeling or remembering. It’s a deep way to show what’s inside you through art.

Don’t rush the process. Let your heart and hand guide you.

Mirror of Feelings

Broken Heart Drawing Ideas

Broken Heart Drawing Ideas

A Heart Shaped Window Made of Glass, Shattered into Pieces

Picture this: your heart’s tough, but glass shows it’s fragile too.

Think of it as putting your feelings on a piece of paper, one jagged line at a time.

A Heart Shaped Window Made of Glass, Shattered into Pieces

Two Halves of a Heart, Separated by a Vast, Empty Space

Ever felt miles apart from someone?

Draw two halves of a heart with a big gap in between. Use straight lines for simplicity or curve them for a bit of drama.

The empty space? It’s for you to fill your paper or canvas with whatever speaks to you. You can even write words that convey your feelings.

Two Halves of a Heart, Separated by a Vast, Empty Space

A Heart Encased in Ice, with Cracks Beginning to Form

Got that chill when someone’s name pops up? Sketch a heart looking cold as ice. Add some cracks here and there.

You’re showing the world that even the coldest hearts can start to warm up and heal.

A Heart Encased in Ice, with Cracks Beginning to Form

A Heart Entangled in Thorny Vines, Showing Both Protection and Pain

It’s a protected yet vulnerable heart, tangled in thorns. With each thorn, think about the little things that hurt but also make us who we are.

A bit of testing your drawing skills, making sure those thorns have just the right sharpness.

A Heart Entangled in Thorny Vines, Showing Both Protection and Pain

A Heart with Stitches, Attempting to Mend Itself

Healing isn’t linear, and your art can show that. Draw a heart with stitches across it. Some are neat; others, not so much.

It’s okay. This heart’s doing its best, just like you.

A Heart with Stitches, Attempting to Mend Itself

A Heart Caught in a Storm, with Lightning Fracturing Its Surface

Ever felt like your emotions were a rainstorm? Draw a heart with lightning striking through. It’s a bit of your own storm on paper.

A Heart Caught in a Storm, with Lightning Fracturing Its Surface

A Heart Floating Adrift at Sea, Torn Sails in the Wind

Feeling adrift? Sketch a heart in the open sea, sails torn and all. It’s a journey, and your heart is the vessel.

Show your resilience, even when the sails aren’t quite up to the task.

A Heart Floating Adrift at Sea, Torn Sails in the Wind

A Heart with Wings, Broken and Unable to Fly

When flight feels impossible, a heart with broken wings says it all. This is about those moments of feeling stuck but remembering that wings can mend.

Your strokes bring those wings to life, bit by bit.

A Heart with Wings, Broken and Unable to Fly

A Heart Locked Inside a Cage, the Key Lost

A locked heart can speak volumes. Draw a cage around a heart. The key? Well, it’s lost, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be found.

Use this sketch to explore themes of freedom and confinement.

A Heart Locked Inside a Cage, the Key Lost

A Heart Being Pieced Together like a Puzzle, a Piece Missing

Life’s a puzzle, hearts included. Sketch a heart-jigsaw puzzle with one piece missing.

Show that, sometimes, not all pieces are in place, and that’s perfectly fine.

A Heart Being Pieced Together like a Puzzle, a Piece Missing

A Heart Surrounded by Falling Autumn Leaves, Symbolizing Change and Loss

Autumn leaves represent change. Surround a heart with them. Different colors, shapes, and sizes, each leaf tells a story of transformation and letting go.

A Heart Surrounded by Falling Autumn Leaves, Symbolizing Change and Loss

A Heart in Chains, Breaking Free

Draw a heart bound by chains, breaking free. This is your moment to shine, showing that freedom is within reach, despite the struggles.

A Heart in Chains, Breaking Free

A Heart on Fire, with the Flames Consuming It from Within

A heart ablaze shows passion, anger, or even rebirth. With each stroke, use warm colors to let the flames dance around the heart, making it a spectacle of emotions.

A Heart on Fire, with the Flames Consuming It from Within

A Heart Mirrored in a Puddle, The Reflection Fractured

Sometimes, we don’t recognize our own hearts. Draw a heart reflected in water, but make the image fractured.

It’s about identity, perception, and the sometimes broken image we see of ourselves.

A Heart Mirrored in a Puddle, The Reflection Fractured

Symbolic Broken Person Drawing Ideas

If broken hearts wasn’t your thing and you’re just feeling broken, I have 30 more drawing ideas that you can try out.

These are more symbolic and about the feeling of being broken in general and not just a broken heart.

A Shattered Mirror Reflecting a Distorted Self-Portrait

A Shattered Mirror Reflecting a Distorted Self-Portrait

Grab a piece of paper and sketch a few jagged lines to represent the broken mirror. In the middle, draw a self-portrait with curved and straight lines to show how you see yourself.

This drawing can be as simple or complicated as you like. It’s all about your inner world.

An Abandoned Building Reclaimed by Nature

Picture an old building and add some greenery growing over it. This one’s a symbol of resilience, showing how nature takes back its space.

Use different colors to bring life to the foliage and the building’s crumbling walls.

An Abandoned Building Reclaimed by Nature

A Clock With Its Gears Exposed and Tangled

Draw a clock but think outside the basic heart shape. Open that clock up and show its tangled gears.

This idea speaks to the complex workings of time and our journey through it.

A Clock With Its Gears Exposed and Tangled

A Wilting Flower in a Cracked Vase

Start with a simple vase shape, add a few cracks with a jagged line, then sketch a drooping flower over it.

This contrast between the flower and its holder highlights beauty in imperfection.

A Wilting Flower in a Cracked Vase

A Torn Photograph Pieced Back Together

Imagine your favorite photo torn to bits. Now, put it back together like puzzle pieces on your drawing pad.

It doesn’t need to be perfect. A bit of testing shows your drawing skills and the healing process.

A Torn Photograph Pieced Back Together

A Broken Violin With Strings Detached

If music speaks to you, this is a great idea. Sketch a violin, then add some disconnected strings.

It’s a nod to the silent echoes of a once favorite song.

A Broken Violin With Strings Detached

A Rusted, Forgotten Bicycle

Draw a bicycle and then let it age on your paper with rust spots and bent wheels. This one’s about things left behind, a gentle nudge on the theme of betrayal.

A Rusted, Forgotten Bicycle

A Cracked Open Sky With Strange Lights Pouring Out

Use your colored pencils to craft a sky. Then split it open with a jagged line. Through this crack, let different colors pour out.

It’s about finding light in unexpected places.

A Cracked Open Sky With Strange Lights Pouring Out

An Ancient Book With Pages Torn and Scattered

This drawing could show the story of time passing. Sketch an open book, then rip some pages out.

These pieces can flow around, showing their own stories.

An Ancient Book With Pages Torn and Scattered

A Portrait With Missing Pieces, Like a Puzzle

Draw a face but leave some parts empty, or fill them with something unexpected like snowflakes or musical instruments.

It’s a deep dive into emotional turmoil without saying a word.

A Portrait With Missing Pieces, Like a Puzzle

A Deserted Playground With a Broken Swing

Capture childhood nostalgia with a twist. Draw a swing with its seat missing, surrounded by silence.

This image can evoke memories and a sense of loss.

A Deserted Playground With a Broken Swing

An Empty Road With Cracks Wide Enough to Swallow Light

Create a long, winding road on your page. Add a few giant cracks, playing with light and dark to create depth.

An Empty Road With Cracks Wide Enough to Swallow Light

A Shattered Glass Globe of the World

Take on the world—literally. Sketch a globe and then break it into pieces. This drawing can express how massive events affect our small worlds.

A Shattered Glass Globe of the World

A Pair of Glasses With One Lens Missing

Start with a typical pair of glasses but remove a lens. This simple idea can reflect a view of life that’s changed or incomplete.

A Pair of Glasses With One Lens Missing

A Bridge Partially Collapsed Into a River

Bridges connect paths, but what happens when they break? Draw this scene to explore themes of separation and the gaps we sometimes face.

A Bridge Partially Collapsed Into a River

A Decaying Tree With Roots Exposed

Trees stand tall and strong, yet even they have their vulnerable moments. Show a tree with its roots bare, holding onto the earth.

A Decaying Tree With Roots Exposed

A Melting Ice Sculpture of Lovers

An ice sculpture usually commands awe, but here’s your chance to show its transient beauty as it melts away. It’s a lesson in letting go.

A Melting Ice Sculpture of Lovers

A Graffiti-Covered Wall Peeling Away

Walls hold stories. Add layers of graffiti and then have some peel off, revealing the histories stacked beneath.

A Graffiti-Covered Wall Peeling Away

An Old, Faded Tattoo on Wrinkled Skin

Skin is our most intimate canvas. Draw an aged tattoo, showing how time transforms our markings and memories.

An Old, Faded Tattoo on Wrinkled Skin

A Dilapidated Shipwreck Partially Submerged

Imagine a ship that’s fought too many storms. Now it rests, half-hidden by the sea, a testament to battles fought and lost.

A Dilapidated Shipwreck Partially Submerged

A Pair of Worn-Out Shoes With Holes

Shoes carry us through life’s journey. Sketch a pair that’s seen better days, highlighting the paths they’ve walked.

A Pair of Worn-Out Shoes With Holes

A Spider Web Torn by the Wind

Capture the delicate dance between creation and destruction. A torn web can symbolize the fragile connections we make.

A Spider Web Torn by the Wind

A Cityscape After a Storm, With Scattered Debris

Cities stand strong, yet storms show their vulnerabilities. Draw this aftermath as a reminder of resilience.

A Cityscape After a Storm, With Scattered Debris

A Burnt Forest With New Life Sprouting

From destruction comes new growth. Sketch a forest reborn from ashes, a sign of hope and new beginnings.

A Burnt Forest With New Life Sprouting

An Old, Unplayed Piano With Broken Keys

Pianos hold melodies and memories. A silent one, with keys askew, might whisper of forgotten songs.

An Old, Unplayed Piano With Broken Keys

A Cracked Smartphone Screen

In our digital age, a broken screen can feel like a major disconnect. Use this drawing to explore themes of communication and isolation.

A Cracked Smartphone Screen

A Worn-Out Diary With Frayed Edges

Diaries are witnesses to our inner feelings. Show one that’s been through a lot, its stories almost spilling out.

A Worn-Out Diary With Frayed Edges

A Collapsed Sandcastle at the Edge of the Tide

Sandcastles are symbols of temporary beauty. Draw one as the tide claims it back, a poignant reminder of impermanence.

A Collapsed Sandcastle at the Edge of the Tide

A Broken Compass With a Spinning Needle

Navigation tools guide us, but what if they’re broken? This image might ponder direction and uncertainty in life.

A Broken Compass With a Spinning Needle

A Moth-Eaten Piece of Clothing Hanging Loosely

Clothes often define moments or phases in our lives. A garment coming undone can represent change, loss, or transformation.

A Moth-Eaten Piece of Clothing Hanging Loosely

No matter your skill levels, whether you’re doodling on scrap or creating life paintings, what matters most is the story unfolding from your pencil.

Your art teaches, heals, and maybe, just maybe, it turns a bit of grief into something beautiful.

Finding Inspiration for Broken Drawing Ideas

Finding Inspiration for Broken Drawing Ideas

Drawing Emotions Through Broken Imagery

When it feels like you’re navigating through a maze of emotional turmoil, grab your doodle pads and let’s channel that energy into art.

It’s all about transforming feelings of grief, loss, or betrayal into striking visuals.

Think of your piece of paper like a best friend who’s ready to listen, no judgments passed.

Start with something simple. A broken heart shape isn’t just for beginners; it’s a universal symbol that speaks volumes.

With a bit of testing and a lot of time, you can layer your feelings onto this basic heart shape.

Use jagged lines for the edges. It’s like turning the echoes of a vulnerable heart into visible cracks.

If you’re up for it, throw in some thorns or tear drops to show that it’s more than just a sketch—it’s your inner world making a splash on paper.

Dive into the hues of your emotions with different colors. Choosing the right color scheme can turn your drawing from a simple sketch to an evocative art piece.

Blues and grays can mirror sadness, while a splash of red might highlight the intensity of your feelings.

If straight lines and simple shapes seem too straightforward for your seasoned artist vibe, why not try incorporating puzzle pieces?

It’s a perfect way to symbolize the complexity of piecing emotions back together.

Each puzzle piece can represent a fragment of your story, your journey through healing, or a moment of realization.

Got a favorite song that tugs at your heartstrings every time? Use its lyrics as a backdrop for your drawing.

It can be subtle, like a whisper in the wind, or as bold as the headline act at a rock concert.

This not only adds a personal touch but also connects your artwork to a piece of your life’s soundtrack.

Let’s not forget the power of mixing and matching different patterns and images.

A broken heart-shaped balloon floating away from a hand, a clock with its gears exposed, or even detailed life paintings can all convey feelings of letting go, time passing, and healing.

The idea is to tell a story, your story, without saying a word.

How To Deal with Feeling Broken

How To Deal with Feeling Broken

Life’s got its ups and downs, like a rollercoaster that sometimes leaves you feeling a bit upside down.

Feeling broken? Don’t worry, you’re far from alone. Here’s a little guide on how to tackle those feelings head-on.

Seek Help If You Feel You Need It

It’s totally okay not to be okay. If you’re feeling more down than usual, reaching out for help can be a game changer.

Whether it’s chatting with a mental health professional or finding support groups, taking that step can make a world of difference.

Remember, asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness.

Talk To Someone

Got a friend or family member you trust? Opening up to them about what you’re going through can be incredibly freeing.

You’d be surprised how much a simple chat can lift your spirits. And who knows? They might share their own stories of feeling broken, reminding you that we’re all in this together.

We All Have Felt Broken At One Point

Feeling broken is part of the human condition. It doesn’t matter if you’re a teenager tackling school or someone in their 50s navigating life’s challenges; we’ve all been there. Embrace this shared experience. It’s what makes us human.

Work Through The Pain – It’s Not Forever

Pain might feel like an unwelcome guest that’s overstayed its welcome. But trust me, it’s not forever.

Give yourself a bit of testing, patience, and time. Healing is a journey, not a sprint. Before you know it, you’ll look back and realize how far you’ve come.

Channel The Feelings Into Making Art

Why not turn those feelings into something beautiful? Grab some colored pencils, a piece of paper, and let those emotions flow.

You don’t need to be a seasoned artist to create an evocative art piece.

From drawing a simple broken heart shape with different colors to sketching out scenes that resonate with your inner world, art can be a perfect way to process your feelings.

Try adding puzzle pieces or tear drops to your drawing to symbolize putting yourself back together or the grief you’re moving through.

Creating art isn’t just about the end product; it’s about the journey.

It’s about taking those zigzags, straight lines, and jagged lines of your emotions and making something uniquely yours.

So, let your heart lead the way. Who knows? You might just create something that not only helps you heal but resonates with others on their journey too.

Techniques to Portray Brokenness in Art

Using Symbolism and Metaphors

When you’re diving into the deep end of broken drawing ideas, the treasure chest of symbolism and metaphors is your best friend.

Think of each symbol as a shortcut, a way to communicate complex emotions without writing an essay.

A shattered mirror? It’s not just bad luck—it’s your reflection, fragmented by life’s ups and downs.

Or how about drawing puzzle pieces that don’t quite fit together? That’s you, trying to piece together the puzzle of life, where sometimes, a piece goes missing under the couch, never to be seen again.

Don’t be afraid to mix and match symbols. Your drawing may feature a real heart entangled in thorns, illustrating the physical pain of emotional turmoil.

Colors play a huge role here, too. A dark, stormy palette can set the mood for your art, letting viewers know, “Hey, this piece isn’t about sunshine and rainbows.”

Remember, symbols are potent; a simple, curved line can turn a basic heart shape into a vulnerable heart, whispering tales of your inner world.

Adding In Some Fragmentation in Composition

In case you didn’t know, fragmentation in composition is when artists break up pictures or objects into pieces and then put them back together in a cool, mixed-up way.

Alright, let’s get visual. Fragmentation isn’t just for professional artists; it’s an open field for anyone with a piece of paper and a bit of curiosity.

Start with a broken heart shape—easy, right? Now, imagine that heart shattering into a million little pieces, each piece drifting off, carried by the wind of your artistic journey.

That’s fragmentation. It’s not just about breaking objects into parts; it’s about telling a story of separation and the quest to become whole again.

Want to level up? Throw in a bit of testing with different patterns and textures.

Maybe one fragment of your broken heart has jagged lines, vibrating with the intensity of a love song played too loud.

Another piece could be smooth, calm, like a healing summer breeze. It’s all about contrast and, honestly, a lot of fun.

Embracing Imperfections in Art

Here’s a little secret: embracing imperfections in your artwork is like making peace with the chaos in your closet.

It’s there, it’s a bit of a mess, but it’s uniquely yours. When drawing broken objects or exploring broken heart drawing ideas, let those shaky hands and uneven lines shine.

They add character, telling the world, “Hey, I’m human, and so is my art.”

In this realm, mistakes aren’t just tolerated; they’re celebrated. Ever heard of wabi-sabi? It’s a Japanese concept that finds beauty in imperfection and transience.

Apply that to your art. That tear drop that looks more like a snowflake? It’s not a mistake; it’s a surprise element adding depth to your piece.

Your drawing skills might not be perfect, but they’re yours, and that’s what makes your art genuine and relatable.

Remember, art teachers often say it’s about the process, not just the final piece. Each line, each color, each smudge tells a story.

Your story. So next time you sit down with your doodle pad, think of it as a conversation with your inner feelings.

Let them out, let them play. Before you know it, you’ll have created something that resonates not just with you, but with others too.

Showcasing Broken Drawing Ideas in a Gallery

When you think of expressing your inner world, drawing can be a path paved with gold.

It’s not just about the finished piece; it’s the journey there, spilling your guts on a piece of paper. Broken drawing ideas, especially, speak volumes.

They whisper tales of heartache, emotional turmoil, and yes, healing. Let’s dive into how you can showcase these evocative art pieces in a gallery of your own making.

My favorite self portrait of mine is the one I did when I turned 30.

I really felt broken and down at that time and instead of turning into a crying mess, I grabbed my art supplies and started work on one of my most sought after artworks. I will never sell it.

Start with a theme. Maybe it’s the jagged line between love and heartbreak or the puzzle pieces of a healing summer.

Your theme is your guide, so pick one that sings to your soul. Now, let’s talk about execution.

You don’t need to be a seasoned artist with years of drawing skills under your belt. Beginners and art teachers alike can create moving pieces with simple shapes, different colors, and a bit of testing.

Remember, the beauty of art lies in its power to evoke feelings, to connect on a deeply personal level.

And when your pieces are ready, sharing them on social media can invite others into your world, offering them a glimpse of your journey and perhaps inspiring them on their own.

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